Dairy Goat Society of Western Australia

Items For Home Cheesemaking

An accurate thermometer that measures from 0-100C
A Timer
A small plastic syringe (1 -3ml) for measuring out rennet
A slotted spoon or ladle (stainless steel is good)
A 5 litre or 10 litre  stainless steel pot (Pasta pots are good)
Note:- I heat my milk directly on the stove, some cheesemakers recommend using a water bath (i.e. your milk pot inside another larger pot containing hot water).
Rennet (to curdle the milk) 
Starter Culture (mostly I use type A, Type B and Type C yoghurt starters, with these you can make a wide range of cheeses)
Cheese baskets for draining your curds. 
Cheesecloth ( For certain recipes)
Note:- at www.cheeselinks.com.au you can browse and acquire all of the items needed for home cheesemaking.
Their book “Home Cheesemaking” is a great resource.

An accurate thermometer that measures from 0-100C

A Timer

A small plastic syringe (1 -3ml) for measuring out rennet

A slotted spoon or ladle (stainless steel is good)

A 5 litre or 10 litre  stainless steel pot (Pasta pots are good)

Note:- I heat my milk directly on the stove, some cheesemakers recommend using a water bath (i.e. your milk pot inside another larger pot containing hot water).

Rennet (to curdle the milk) 

Starter Culture (mostly I use type A, Type B and Type C yoghurt starters, with these you can make a wide range of cheeses)

Cheese baskets for draining your curds. 

Cheesecloth ( For certain recipes)

Note:- at www.cheeselinks.com.au you can browse and acquire all of the items needed for home cheesemaking. Their book “Home Cheesemaking” is a great resource.

Rule Number 1. 

Cleanliness is essential.
I use a stainless steel pasta pot to create the curd from the milk.
The Curd then goes on to make the various cheeses. Pay attention to your hands and wash frequently. Cheese making is a great hands on hobby

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Queso Blanco

I started making cheese as a diversion, or rehabilitation after some medical issues. Also from time to time we had a surplus of goats milk , far too much for us to drink. The very first cheese I made was called Queso Blanco, (White Cheese). This is the simplest of all to make and can easily be made in the home kitchen....

It is used throughout the world by different names.  It can be eaten straight or mixed in with various dishes. 

Try it in your lasagna recipes instead of Ricotta or in addition to it.  Yum!

Ingredients

5 Litres Whole Milk (Preferably goats milk!!)  1/4 Cup White Vinegar** 

Directions

Heat milk to 82 C stirring constantly.  Be careful not to burn the milk.
While mixing with a whisk, slowly add the white vinegar.  You will notice the milk begins to curdle.
Keep stirring for 10-15 minutes.
Line a colander with fine cheesecloth. 
Pour the curdled milk through the colander.
Allow the curds to cool for about 20 minutes.
Tie the four corners of the cheese cloth together and hang it to drain for about 5 - 7 hours (until it stops dripping).
The solidified cheese can be broken apart and salted to taste or kept unsalted.

** The juice of 3-5 lemons may also be used in substitute to vinegar and you will get the same texture but with a sweeter citrus flavour.

*You can add dried mixed herbs or chopped mint or caraway seeds for variations to the basic cheese.

*You can also roll it into logs and then roll the log in herbs or seeds to get more variation.

Recipe supplied by Tony The Woodyville Cheesemaker 

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Chevre

Chevre (French for goat or goat’s cheese) is a soft white eat now cheese which is easy to make and has many uses. It can be eaten on biscuits with things like dill pickles, or smoked salmon, dried apricots, etc.

 It goes with just about everything. It is also wonderful in cooking. In the Recipe section of this site you will find some foolproof recipes, using Chevre.  It has a very high melting point so, if it is baked or grilled, it goes a lovely golden colour on the outside and is hot and delicious inside.

 

This is my way of making it, (with lots of help from that great little book from Cheeselinks “Home Cheesemaking”).

I personally use unpasteurized goat’s milk, produced with an eye to cleanliness and hygiene.

It is easy to pasteurize if you want to go down that path.

 

A stainless steel pot with 5 litres of full cream unpasteurised goat’s milk is heated to 25C.

If you use milk straight from milking the temperature will be about 30C.

 

Add a tiny amount of powdered type B starter (about 1/20th of a teaspoon works fine) and stir thoroughly through the milk.

 

Once the starter is in add  0.3ml of rennet and once again stir thoroughly for a couple of minutes. Since it is such a small quantity of rennet you may wish to add it to 30ml of cooled boiled water. Rainwater or spring water or filtered water is best since any chlorine in the water can affect the rennet action.

 

Leave the milk to curdle for 4 hours and the gently ladle into cheese hoops sterilized with boiling water. Leave to drain overnight before turning the cheeses over in the hoops and let drain for say another 12-24 hours depending on how you like the consistency from moist to a slightly firmer and drier style.

 

After turning out from the hoops they cheese can be wrapped in cling film, or greaseproof paper or food grade plastic containers. It should be consumed within two weeks, however if left too long, just check it before use.

 

Recipe supplied by Tony The Woodyville Cheesemaker 

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Ripper Ricotta

Ricotta is Italian for "recooked" because it is made by "cooking" whey.  It makes delicious lasagne, ravioli stuffing, gnocchi, cannoli, cheese-stuffed shells and blintzes, or a type of cheese cake.

Here's how you can make your own.

 

Save the whey from making cheese in a non-reactive pot. Filter as many of the curd particles out as you can since they would otherwise form tough "beads" in the final ricotta.

 

Heat the whey with stirring, taking care to avoid sticking or burning. Use either a double boiler, or a pot with a very thick bottom which will disperse the heat well.  Once the whey is up to boiling point add white vinegar slowly while stirring.  Reduce the heat to just under the boil.  When you see specks appearing in the whey stop adding vinegar.

 Be careful. If it boils, it can boil over.

 

Remove from heat.  Cover and allow the "cooked" whey to cool undisturbed until comfortable to the touch. The curds should look like clouds suspended in the whey, while the whey appears clear and yellowish green.

Do not stir up the curd: Set up a receiving pot with a large strainer and a fine clean cloth on top. If the curd is floating, you may dip out the curd into the cloth.  Alternatively, if the curd all sinks, pour as much of the whey through the cloth as you can without disturbing the curds. It will filter through much faster if you do this carefully without stirring up the curds.

 

Gently scoop out the curds.  Because the curds are very fine and delicate,  they can stop up the cloth easily. This will cause very slow draining if they are broken up. Much of the whey will drain out as you dip the curd.

 

Drain the whey through the cloth (be patient, it can take up to 2-3 hours).  I use a stainless steel colander and stir it gently by hand so that it drains rapidly.  Pick up the corners of the cloth, suspend it like a bag over the drainage pot (or sink), and allow the last of the whey to drain out.

 

 It will take several hours, and can be done in the refrigerator over night.   Remove the ricotta from the cloth, pack into a container, cover and store in the refrigerator. Use it soon after making.  Alternatively, ricotta will freeze very well.

Yield:-  Around 200-300gms from 2-3litres of whey.

 

Recipe supplied by Tony The Woodyville Cheesemaker

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Goats Milk Feta

This is another versatile cheese which is wonderful when made from Full cream dairy goats milk. It can be eaten as is and is a great accompaniment to wine and beer (or both!!) It can be used in salads, and also in cooking (there are some recipes further on).  It can be marinated in olive oil and herbs for that gourmet touch.

 

A stainless steel pot with 10 litres of full cream unpasteurised goat’s milk is heated to 32C. If you use milk straight from milking the temperature will be about 30C so very little heating is required. If heating from the fridge then I have the stove element set at about half its capacity. Stir occasionally.

Add a tiny amount of powdered type A starter (about 1/20th of a teaspoon works fine) and stir thoroughly through the milk.

 

Once the starter is in, add 1.6ml of rennet and once again stir thoroughly for a couple of minutes. Since it is such a small quantity of rennet you may wish to add it to 160ml of cooled boiled water. Rainwater or spring water or filtered water is best since any chlorine in the water can affect the rennet action.

 

Maintaining the temperature (Generally I turn the element almost off) allow the curd to form, allow 90 minutes. Then using a sterilized knife (I use the bread knife) cut the curd into one cm cubes and allow to stand. Over the next two hours stir the curd very gently a few times to drive out more whey (The liquid that drains from the curd).

 

The curds are then ladled into the hoop or mold (I am now using a large Tallegio basket from Cheeselinks which will hold up to two kilos of cheese, you can buy smaller square moulds specifically for fetta.

 

I drain my feta for 24 hours turning it once or twice during that period, then I place the block of cheese into cooled brine made from 150-200grams of cooking salt and a litre or so of boiled water. You can leave the block it in the brine from 2 to 24 hours.

 

You can pack it cubed in sterilized jars in the brine, or wrap it, I now have a Sunbeam vacuum packing machine and I pack mine in fairly large blocks (200-300grams). It will last for months in the fridge, using either method.

 

Yield:- 10 litres of milk will give you around 1.4 to 1.8kg of cheese.

Upcoming show and event dates

UPCOMING 2017 EVENT LISTING

(When exhibiting goats at any Show you must complete a Waybill and include the PIC no. of that Show Ground. These are listed below.)

Northam Agricultural Show (PIC No.WCSG0089) 9 September 2017

see Website http://www.northamshow.com.au/

Perth Royal Show (PIC No.WCSG0001) 23 - 30 September 2017

see Website http://www.perthroyalshow.com.au/

Dardanup Bull & Barrel Festival (PIC No.WCSG0022) 7 October 2017

(Display only) see Website www.bullandbarrel.net.au

Toodyay Show (PIC No. WCSG0030) 7 October 2017

(Display and soap sales only) see Website www.toodyayagsociety.com.au

Kelmscott /Branch Show (PIC No. WCSG0033) 14 October 2017

see Website http://kelmscottshow.com.au/

Brunswick Show (PIC No. WCSG0019) 21 October 2017

see Website http://brunswickshow.com.au/

Gidgegannup Show (PIC No. WCSG0023) 28 October 2017

see Website http://gidgegannup.info/community/agsociety.htm

Busselton Show (PIC No. WCSG0036) 28 October 2017

see Website http://www.busseltonshow.com.au/

Collie Show (PIC No. WBSG0034) 18 November 2017

see Website www.collieag.org.au

Osborne Park Show (PIC No. WASG0075) 18 November 2017

(Incorporating WA Futurity Stakes- 1st Lactation Doe class)

see Website http://opas.org.au/